BA discriminated against employee over crucifix, European Court rules

15 Jan, 2013

 

The European Court of Human Rights has ruled that British Airways discriminated against a Christian employee for banning her from visibly wearing a crucifix necklace. 
The court ruled that the rights of Nadia Eweida’s were violated under Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights. 
After the rulings, the Archbishop of York said in a statement: “Christians and those of other faiths should be free to wear the symbols of their own religion without discrimination.
“Christians are not obliged to wear a cross but should be free to show their love for and trust in Jesus Christ in this way if they so wish.”
Eweida’s case was one of four taken to the European Court of Human Rights in which employers were accused of discriminating against employees on grounds of religion. 
Shirley Chaplin, 57, was also stopped from wearing crucifix necklaces by her employer while she worked in an NHS hospital, Gary McFarlane, was sacked from his role as a marriage counsellor after refusing to give therapy to gay couples, and Lillian Ladele was disciplined in her role as registrar after refusing to carry out same-sex civil partnership ceremonies. 
All three lost their case; while Eweida was successful. 

The European Court of Human Rights has ruled that British Airways discriminated against a Christian employee for banning her from visibly wearing a crucifix necklace. The court ruled that the rights of Nadia Eweida’s were violated under Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights. 

 

After the rulings, the Archbishop of York said in a statement: “Christians and those of other faiths should be free to wear the symbols of their own religion without discrimination.”Christians are not obliged to wear a cross but should be free to show their love for and trust in Jesus Christ in this way if they so wish.”

 

Eweida’s case was one of four taken to the European Court of Human Rights in which employers were accused of discriminating against employees on grounds of religion. 

 

Shirley Chaplin, 57, was also stopped from wearing crucifix necklaces by her employer while she worked in an NHS hospital, Gary McFarlane, was sacked from his role as a marriage counsellor after refusing to give therapy to gay couples, and Lillian Ladele was disciplined in her role as registrar after refusing to carry out same-sex civil partnership ceremonies. 

 

All three lost their case; while Eweida was successful. 

 

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